You Will, You Can, You Can, You Will

I'm Lisa

dajo42:

[approaches straight couple] so which of you is the yard sard and which is the yale sale

(via pukegoddess)

Indulging in some much needed self love tonight.

malditapress:

"Some are born with busts, some are born with butts, but whatever makes you feel confident and like loving yourself more, be proud. I’m all for it. ”

Gawd she’s my fave.

(Source: missyperegrym, via lapinchecanela)

This other girl I had a crush on, Antoinette, became my friend in 8th grade and I was always so smitten by her.
And our friendship really grew in high school.
I realized I was in love with her in 11th grade.
She was my first girlfriend. And even though our relationship was short lived, I learned a lot.
She’s one of the few people I still keep in contact with from high school.
And I still lover her very much and am proud of how far she has gone in life. She even has a daughter now. And is engaged to this seemingly nice girl(I’ve never met her).

Also, when we told our parents about our relationship they all freaked out and tried to separate us. So we attempted to run away together. Young love haha.

After watching Mosquita y Mari, I can’t help but to think back to my friendships with girls and how I secretly always had a crush on them. One of the first being this girl named Joanna.
We were in 7th grade.
She would come over to my house a lot.
And sometimes she would be mean to me but I realize now that we both had major crushes on each other. And I would always feel this urge to touch her, even if it was subtly. But I didn’t know it was a crush until later on, when I started questioning my sexuality.
And I remember just having this “Oh my god, I liked her” moment.

fatandfabulousmermaid:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

pinkcookiedimples:

bombboldbeauty:

Black Egyptian excellence.

Why was Dreamworks one of the only ones who actually attempted to be historically accurate?

It’s genuinely depressing to think that some movies being made today are actually WORSE when it comes to representation than movies made years ago 

One of my favorite movies. I went to a Christian school so since it was about a story in the bible I would always convince our teacher’s to play it so we could discuss the story after. When really I just got to watch my fav movie over and over

fatandfabulousmermaid:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

pinkcookiedimples:

bombboldbeauty:

Black Egyptian excellence.

Why was Dreamworks one of the only ones who actually attempted to be historically accurate?

It’s genuinely depressing to think that some movies being made today are actually WORSE when it comes to representation than movies made years ago

One of my favorite movies. I went to a Christian school so since it was about a story in the bible I would always convince our teacher’s to play it so we could discuss the story after. When really I just got to watch my fav movie over and over

(via letthewhiteflagsfly)

cacatuasulphureacitrinocristata:

lolsomeone-actually:

CHARACTER DEVELOPEMENT

And you know the best thing about this movie is they could have made Felix be the nice guy, be the understanding guy, the only guy who’s kind to Ralph, but they make him just as prejudiced as the other game characters. He wasn’t mean to Ralph per say, but he wasn’t nice either, and definitely didn’t want to get involved with the trouble that followed Ralph around.

It’s only after Felix gets treated badly himself that he starts looking at how Ralph is treated by others, how Ralph is treated by him and changes his attitude.

Because that’s the thing, you don’t have to be the bad guy to be prejudiced. Sometimes you can be the nice guy who doesn’t do anything for or against, and sometimes that’s just as bad.

This movie. Ugh.

(via letthewhiteflagsfly)

tw-koreanhistory:

Gone In 41 Seconds — Police Quick to Kill Korean Artist

Feb 24, 2008

LA HABRA, Calif. — On the afternoon of December 31, 2007, two police officers encountered Michael Cho in the parking lot of a liquor store in La Habra, a small, generally quiet city in Orange County, California. It didn’t take long for the meeting to go bad. After less than a minute the officers unleashed a barrage of bullets on the 25-year-old artist, ending his life - and setting off an ongoing cascade of protests across Southern California’s Korean American community.

Computerized police logs obtained by New America Media suggest the officers quickly turned to deadly force when they confronted Cho, whom they suspected of vandalism. According to the Computer Automated Transcript documenting the incident, at 2:04 p.m. the cops contacted their dispatcher to say they’d located Cho. “Out with the subject near the liquor store,” the transcript reads. Just 41 seconds later they radioed dispatch again, this time saying they’d shot the suspect and now needed paramedics to attend to him. “Shot fired, Suspect down, Medics requested,” reads the transcript. In the aftermath of the killing, Cho’s family has publicly condemned the department, saying the officers rushed to shoot Cho, rather than using less lethal tools like pepper spray or Taser stun guns to subdue him.

“The police killed my son like a dog,” Cho’s mother, Honglan Cho, recently told the La Habra City Council. According to Shelly Lynn Kaufman, an attorney for the Cho family, the fusillade of bullets left ten holes in his body.

Read More: http://news.newamericamedia.org/news/view_article.html?article_id=ad58d8b8031a47854d3676200f5c5be5 

(via shroomingwithyourspiritguide)

rhyse:

When I was at the lowest spot in my depression I locked myself in my bedroom for three days and lied to everyone I knew. I called in sick to work. I told my mom I was seeing a doctor. I told my friends I was busy. I had successfully fooled everyone who loved me that I was making healthy changes and getting better. I wasn’t, but it was so much easier to hide and pretend that I was than to actually go outside and do something. 

Read More

(via lachicanarosie)

womenwhokickass:

Aurora Guerrero: Why she kicks ass
She is a  filmmaker, LGBT director, and screenwriter from California, who describes as activist first and filmmaker second. She focuses on collaborative work with her communities creating art forms that offer opportunities for dialogue and education.
In 2005 her short film "Pura Lengua" debuted at the Sundance Film Festival. Her second short film, "Viernes Girl" won the 2005 HBO/New York International Latino Film Festival short film competition.
In 2012, Guerrero made her feature film debut at the Sundance Film Festival with Mosquita y Mari becoming the first Chicana filmmaker to debut a feature-length film who was also previously a Sundance Institute and Ford Foundation Fellow.
The film tells the coming-of-age story of two teen Chicanas in Huntington Park, California who form a relationship ignited by sexual attraction. Guerrero describes an attraction to speaking about “actual violence within silence,” taboo subjects that are not easily spoken about between parents and children.
Guerrero’s achievements led to a slot in Filmmaker Magazine’s 2006 “25 New Faces of Independent Film.”

womenwhokickass:

Aurora Guerrero: Why she kicks ass

  • She is a  filmmakerLGBT director, and screenwriter from California, who describes as activist first and filmmaker second. She focuses on collaborative work with her communities creating art forms that offer opportunities for dialogue and education.
  • In 2005 her short film "Pura Lengua" debuted at the Sundance Film Festival. Her second short film, "Viernes Girl" won the 2005 HBO/New York International Latino Film Festival short film competition.
  • In 2012, Guerrero made her feature film debut at the Sundance Film Festival with Mosquita y Mari becoming the first Chicana filmmaker to debut a feature-length film who was also previously a Sundance Institute and Ford Foundation Fellow.
  • The film tells the coming-of-age story of two teen Chicanas in Huntington Park, California who form a relationship ignited by sexual attraction. Guerrero describes an attraction to speaking about “actual violence within silence,” taboo subjects that are not easily spoken about between parents and children.
  • Guerrero’s achievements led to a slot in Filmmaker Magazine’s 2006 “25 New Faces of Independent Film.”